Adulting: Phobias of Needles

Autistics have multiple phobias of doing things mainly brought forth by induced anxiety. Throughout childhood, this fear resonated deep within me and even today I have some unquenched fears before getting an injection or blood draw. However, I have slowly understood that these events are a necessary function of life that must be undertaken for my health.

Adultiing: Task Execution and Management

Becoming an adult, especially in an independent living situation requires the execution and management of tasks that need to be completed on a routine basis in order to keep the habitat a well-oiled machine. Things need to be done, but keeping balance with everything else can be quite tough for one’s executive functioning.

Adulting: Being Proud of Your Talents

Being an autistic adult, I always want to throw a pity party about how bad life is for me. Sometimes, all it takes is a good therapy session for someone to remind me of all the talents I have and how I yet shy away from showing who my true self is so others can applaud my efforts that I do for the community both far and wide.

Adulting: Hearing What You Don’t Want to Hear

Nowadays the comorbidities of being autistic and having other mental health conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia is more prevalent than ever. With the blending of these comorbidities when something is communicated, it can cause a trigger to the autistic person in the form of unwanted behavior or anxieties.

Adulting: Consent

In last week’s adulting blog, I discussed being independent and having the ability to make your own choices and own them without feeling invalid. This week, while accepting more boundaries for myself made me understand that I, along with anyone else autistic or neurotypical, have rights for themselves. One of the struggles that I see in many autistics, including myself, is that of  consent.

Adulting: Making Choices for YOU!

When an autistic adult makes that big leap into independence. They are oftentimes away from the cusp of their very guarding parents, however some can still remain a close bond. The circumstances for this can remain very complex and as a result can make the ability for the autistic person to feel at ease about making decisions that they can feel comfortable or that they know is in their best interest, despite their close supporters objecting to their choices.

Adulting: Change of Support

As many autistic people, I have difficulty experiencing when supports change. I define support as anything that is essential for me to experience my day. The past year has brought several changes of support in many autistics because of burnout of those providing support, I am no exception to the rule from experiencing this issue.

Adulting: Task Management

While some with autism are pre-programmed to make lists, there are still a host of autidtic individuals that for the life of them cannot fathom the ability to ensure that all the tasks they need to do in order to have a functional life cannot be assured, even as they prepare for independence by living with family or another similar situation.