Sometimes Enough is Enough

There are times when you have just had enough. You cannot be the solver to everyone’s problems nor can you be the supporter for them whenever you are unable to hold your own mental health grounding. I must realize that I need to take care of my mental health and accept the fact that I need to be assertive and fight for what I need to do to take care of myself.

Adulting: Consent

In last week’s adulting blog, I discussed being independent and having the ability to make your own choices and own them without feeling invalid. This week, while accepting more boundaries for myself made me understand that I, along with anyone else autistic or neurotypical, have rights for themselves. One of the struggles that I see in many autistics, including myself, is that of  consent.

Can We Really Be a Friend?

For many in the autism community, we want someone to be our friend. Sometimes, I have been told that it takes us the person ourselves to be a friend to someone else. It is difficult for many people with autism to do and can become very taxing at times to have a return effect. All we want sometimes is for someone to be there for us, however after investing a lot of energy it can seem difficult when little energy by the other party is given.

Adulting: Breaking Points

All human beings have breaking points when becoming irritated. However, autistics have certain triggering and breaking points that because of sensory or other overload or triggers of information that may be empathetic of how their day is that it becomes the point that they reach their breaking point.

#HireAutisticAdults: Keep Us Engaged

In recent years, there have been a number of initiatives to hire autistic adults as they age out of high school, because they oftentimes need a solid day of structured activity. This doesn’t mean that they are meaningless people. It’s just that they need to put their creative juices to work.

It’s OK in Your Space

This week, I have shared a few Tik Tok’s about being diagnosed in the 1990s and not knowing some autism behaviors that are common today. We just did them, we didn’t know the jargon that is used for them today. One must also understand that given one’s space it needs to be their safe space and they are free to express themselves in the way they wish.

Concentrating On COVID: A Slow Return

To say that COVID has affected the mental health of those around the world would be an understatement. Even for those individuals including autistics that have had to experience a multitude of changes over the past fifteen months has been a challenge to say the least. I am very grateful that I have had not any ill effects of the virus or was not furloughed from my employment as a result of the pandemic. COVID added to an already traumatic experience that I was experiencing that ultimately caused me to be on the lookout for what would be my current home.

Knowing Your Limits

Being independent for almost three years has taught me some life lessons in being independent. I have done some things in that time I haven’t been proud of and there’s things I’ve not succeeded at. However, it is a learning curve and within time it gets better. There’s this great thing called boundaries that you have to develop that can be a challenge. Once you learn the power of it and knowing when to stand your ground, it is a wonderful thing.

Adulting: Autonomy

For many autistics, the ability to make one’s decisions can be a difficult task for an autistic to perform. For the younger crowd, one that seems to lack the ability or show the interest of one doing this will result in the parent making these choices for them, which can result in friction between the autistic and their parents. An autistic should have the autonomy to be the person they so choose to be without judgement from their parents and supporters, yet have the support they need to thrive in their world.