Family and Ally Voices DO Matter

In the past few years the hashtag and theme of #actuallyautustic have been more present than ever. While for decades the voices of autistics have been dialed down. We must remember that autistics come from many walks of life and sometimes need the voice and support of their family and/or related allies in one’s journey. Therefore, I feel it is important that all voices in one’s journey may need to be heard.

Adulting: Consent

In last week’s adulting blog, I discussed being independent and having the ability to make your own choices and own them without feeling invalid. This week, while accepting more boundaries for myself made me understand that I, along with anyone else autistic or neurotypical, have rights for themselves. One of the struggles that I see in many autistics, including myself, is that of  consent.

Adulting: Change of Support

As many autistic people, I have difficulty experiencing when supports change. I define support as anything that is essential for me to experience my day. The past year has brought several changes of support in many autistics because of burnout of those providing support, I am no exception to the rule from experiencing this issue.

Disasters Bring Out the Best

If you are eastern United States, you are for sure hearing something with the word “Ida” in it. What was part of a terrible Hurricane and now as of this writing a Tropical Depression has been an overwork for me in the anxiety department this week. This is a crucial reason why those with autism and other disabilities should have in place a plan in the event of a disaster.

How to set Healty Boundaries

This week I found a post on the social media platforms for the Hiki app, an online dating and friendship app for the autism community. This topic was requested by one of their users because they too struggle with boundaries. Boundaries can be difficult to define and build, but once you do, you will feel better physically and mentally.

Can We Really Be a Friend?

For many in the autism community, we want someone to be our friend. Sometimes, I have been told that it takes us the person ourselves to be a friend to someone else. It is difficult for many people with autism to do and can become very taxing at times to have a return effect. All we want sometimes is for someone to be there for us, however after investing a lot of energy it can seem difficult when little energy by the other party is given.

Making Sure We Can Have the Same Opportunities as Everyone Else in a Safe Manner

When we as autistics try to do things in life as neurotypicals do, it can present challenges for autistics that aren’t friendly to our needs. We as autistics don’t want special treatment, we just want to be able to do things that make it manageable for us. The world also needs to be aware that autism is indeed a spectrum disorder and does not stop the minute a person turns 18.

Adulting: Individuality

As we know, autism is a spectrum disorder. We as autistics are unique in our very own ways, each and every one of us. No one can change that, nor should we be forced to do so. We as autistics, just as neurotypical human beings should have the freedom have the individuality that we so choose as long as our safety and well-being is kept in mind.