Adulting: Autonomy

For many autistics, the ability to make one’s decisions can be a difficult task for an autistic to perform. For the younger crowd, one that seems to lack the ability or show the interest of one doing this will result in the parent making these choices for them, which can result in friction between the autistic and their parents. An autistic should have the autonomy to be the person they so choose to be without judgement from their parents and supporters, yet have the support they need to thrive in their world.

Adulting: Disability as an Excuse

While some things because of my autism or mental health challenges are at times challenging, sometimes I need to experience them and not play the “card” as a crutch to get out of something. This can be difficult because when thinking independently, it can be hard to make these decisions.

Adulting: Inclusion and Fairness

While in the modern era, we advance to the need for inclusion everywhere we look such as sports, activities, the classroom and so forth, it is also important to teach autistics and others with special needs that life just isn’t fair and sometimes we all can’t be winners.

Putting It In Perspective

Writing this on Easter Sunday because I am bored really puts things into perspective how fortunate I am. We are over a year into the pandemic, when work and my day program shut their doors for almost three months. While some of the activity during that initial time was completed virtually and I along with the majority of the world was introduced to virtual platforms like Zoom, Nothing replaces the old-fashioned way of meeting person to person in methods such as day programs and part-time employment like I do.

Today Begins Autism Acceptance Month

Autism is the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States. 1 in 54 children are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, totaling over 5 million young people and adults. Each April, we celebrate Autism Acceptance Month to spread awareness, promote acceptance, and ignite change.

Adulting: It’s OK to NOT Want To Be A Friend To Someone

Yes, almost every Aspie/Autistic want nothing else than to have a friend, right? But, what if that “friend” doesn’t have any similarities than you do or doesn’t value your input to the level that you feel they should? What if that friend makes you super anxious and causes you to go into a state of autistic burnout or shutdown so you don’t have to tackle the issue head on? Then, this is certainly no friend in any means.

The Importance of Being Regimented

For me I know this is a start of a great beginning. I can and others that provide services to me can realize a sense of happiness that has been missing for some time. I honestly think this is one of the happiest decisions that I have made and at the right time and for the right reasons. I can feel so much happier and more at ease even though we are coming off of a election and in the middle of a global pandemic, my outlook on life is so much greater than it has been in the past year.

A Reflection on bettering myself

learning about myself and what I need to do as far as the adulting category in my life has been a paramount thing that I feel that I need to take action on to better myself. I am slowly realizing that I need to be more of an adult and not be trapped in the 5-year-old vacuum that I have been in during this current chapter