Top Companies Seek Workers With Autism

by Shaun Heasley, Disability Scoop | May 3, 2022 Justin Pierce, who has autism and works as an account support associate, sits at his desk at EY offices in Chicago in 2019. EY is one of several employers that are advertising job openings on a new career portal targeted at neurodivergent individuals. (Jose M. Osorio/Chicago … Continue reading Top Companies Seek Workers With Autism

Reflections: We Change and Grow

As human beings we are often creatures of habit. We cannot often see beyond what we know. Change is often reluctant, being autistic further hinders it. But what if there is a chance to grow and change for the better. We have to sometimes have to lessen our dependence on the things that hold us together because we know it works, there’s a time we have to look beyond what works.

12-Year Work Anniversary

Today has been 12 years since I walked into the office of my employer. All I knew at that time is that I had a job and who my direct supervisor was. I had no idea what the job exactly involved or what I was exactly doing. What I did know was that it was an opportunity that has evolved into being more educated about mental health and advocacy. It is a job that even to this day I still love .

Go With The Flow

As autistics, it can be hard many times to go with the flow. In a week that has been anything but the norm in many cases, the energy that it can generate can negatively affect downtime by putting us out of commission for some time, thus giving us a skewed outlook of the big picture of how things really are.

Recognition Pays

Continuing on this personal growth journey as it ever evolves personally has made me become a well-rounded person in the effects of the many facets that I represent. Part of that has been the ability to accept who I am overall, not just who I want to be, I am learning that I can be who I want to be while understanding and recognizing the need to properly care for myself in the process.

Why do I keep on doing What I Keep On Doing

This week has been a relaxing week and I am ever thankful for it. I am off work again for a little reprieve for a while due to how my schedule and the holiday observances occur. I only had to miss one day of work to have two weeks off, which was nice. But in the course of this week, one of my mental health workers asked me why continue to be involved in my day program and work?

Adulting: Setting Expectations

Being Autistic and growing up with so many struggles, but eventually the good comes out and you experience the good qualities of what being autistic is known for. Swinging between these two factors can play tricks on your mind, specifically your self-esteem and knowing that life is worth living. Many times it can be so hard to see the good in yourself even though those that support you can see it clearly because they have been through the trenches with you.

NDEAM: Recognize the Needs of ALL, especially Disabled Workers in the Workplace

Contrary to popular belief, Autistic People want to work, fairly and equally. We oftentimes can show our struggles or deficits more than our talents. Also those with marginal, and other barriers to employment face constant roadblocks to be a contribution to society not as a backstage piece, but one who is seen in the community and is recognized for their efforts.

NDEAM: The Benefits of Having an Autistic Employee

Being autistic, I have worked in many capacities at most points since I was 18 years old. At some intervals prior, I was volunteering in my community. My parents instilled being autistic was not an excuse to be a couch potato. I needed to do something in my life, no matter if it was only part-time, I was not to be stagnant in the house or be attracted to the computer full-time.