The Other Side

The past few weeks have been full of tension in regards to equality, and the fairness of law enforcement among the marginalized communities in America. Until recently when watching Facebook Watch, I gave never seen the other side and their point of view of how the marginalized are treated by authoritarians and the law. Likewise, I have learned of my ability to appreciate everyone and see through things that matter to persons who don’t see equally.

Yes, the media has been inundated with stories about George Floyd and Rayshard Brooks and their lethal involvement with the law. Yes indeed, it was tragic and both men, have their own past and parts of their life stories that may have a negative connotation to some. However, the ending result which we know most parts is that they were brutalized by law enforcement for reasons we do not know. That story will revive itself in their courtroom arenas in due time. Justice will be served. Nonetheless, it made me realize that minorities are profiled often through no fault of their own by authority figures.

It can be something as simple as swimming in a hotel pool that you and your children are staying at, or looking a certain way at a Walmart or just driving a certain way or doing something that may look subjective to someone who think they have power of a minority. Likewise I seen a video of a Caucasian person who had a unleashed dog in a birding area in New York’s Central Park that regulates leashing of pets and when the person of color kindly tells the Caucasian person that is indeed in the wrong of what they did, they become hostile and feel as if they are threatened and immediately summon law enforcement, profiling the person and yet enhancing the situation to their benefit. This makes myself see the catalyst of why minorities are fearful of persons of authority.

We as autistics have faced our discrimination over the years and are continually under a microscope and marginalized as a result. Add a spectrum of racial or identity minority and you are magnified two to three times more in this regard. So maybe that is why we see straight through the things that others see in a person and see the person for who they are. Sometimes it can cause a autistic to become naive, however we must learn executive functioning in order to overcome this and learn the consequences of what does happen should this occur to one. With these recent events it has made me realize how I do not see a person for the color of their skin or identity, nor what they are wearing or their possessives that they may have. I see them for who they are, regardless of all the aforementioned attributes. It is a good quality and it makes me proud of who I am!

Think before you act, for it will pay dividends either positively or negatively in the future!

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